Dragon Tales from Eastern Europe

Dragon Tales from Eastern Europe – Fiction, Fairy-tales
Available in ebook, paperback, and hardback formats.

Where to Purchase

Ebook: | Amazon | Apple Books | B&N | Kobo | Google Play | Smashwords | Other Retailers

Paperback (ISBN 978-1-949397-05-5): | Amazon | B&N | Walmart | Target (N/A) | Waterstones |

Hardback (978-1-949397-06-2): | Amazon | B&N | Walmart | Target (N/A) | Waterstones |

If you’d like your local bookstore to order a copy, please provide them with the ISBN.

Dragon Tales cover

Once upon a time … dragons lived in castles and captured beautiful princesses.

The majestic dragon is a popular fairy-tale character. This collection of old tales made new introduces you to the creatures from Eastern Europe, many unknown to the Western world. These tales may have been told “once upon a time,” but they remain cherished treasures to those who passed them down generation after generation.

If you enjoy this book and would like to learn more about dragons, check out our nonfiction book on the subject: A Study of Dragons of Eastern Europe.

About

This book is a collection of fairy tales from Eastern Europe. Not any fairy tales, but ones with and about dragons. In many of the hero tales that have been passed down generation after generation, defeating dragons is only one part of the hero’s quest. So, if you don’t see a dragon right away in any one story, read on. One or more will be lurking within the pages.

We’ve edited many of the stories from the sources we’ve used, replacing words such as “thee” and “thou” with “you.” And, although Poe’s raven may prefer “quoth,” we thought “said” would be more familiar to your ears.

Giant snakes were also representations of dragons in some stories. We’ve taken the liberty to change the word “snake” to “dragon” within these tales, but the intent is still the same.

In addition, over the years, some stories have gained religious references. We’ve removed the majority of these, not because we are anti-religion (because we’re not), but to make the stories more suitable to a broader audience. Where a religious aspect was part of the story, we retained the references.

Although some events are repetitive from story to story, we didn’t want to choose between including them. Each tale has its own merits, and so in a few instances, you’ll discover similar tales told in different manners.

If you enjoy this book and would like to learn more about dragons, check out our nonfiction book on the subject: A Study of Dragons of Eastern Europe.